Coffee with Gilmore Girls character book pairings

Fall is here, the leaves are changing colors, the pumpkin spice latte is back at Starbucks… you know what that means: it’s time to rewatch Gilmore girls. Get that flannel and backwards baseball hat out of storage and live your best life!

To celebrate this momentous time of year, we’re featuring our favorite Stars Hollow residents paired with a good book and their ideal cup of coffee coffee coffee!

Lorelai Gilmore

Book: People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry 

Coffee Order: Black

Would you really expect any less? She doesn’t want to dilute the coffee with any cream or sugar, she just wants it as strong as possible. And naturally she would pair it with a fan favorite, because she wants all of the romcom feels.

Rory Gilmore

Book: Beautiful Country by Qian Julie Wang

Coffee Order: Vanilla latte with almond milk and an extra shot of espresso

Ok hear me out, I know she drank a LOT of black coffee in the series, but there WERE times where she ordered a little something different at the coffee cart: proof that people can change! I believe fully that Rory 2.0 from A Year in the Life has evolved to arguably the MOST basic of coffee orders with the vanilla latte, almond milk because again, basic, and the extra shot as a homage to her roots in caffeine. While her order is basic, her reading is anything but. Rory would only pick the most stunning of novels and memoirs to line her bookshelf. And, of course it has to be current: she’s already read everything else!

Emily Gilmore

Book: The Dutch House by Ann Patchett

Coffee: No coffee for the queen, just Abigail’s Blend black tea from the finest tea emporium, Elmwood Fine Teas. A splash of cream and sugar; no more than necessary, but just enough to be high maintenance. 

Just because it’s National Coffee Day does NOT mean everyone on this roster subscribes to coffee… and Emily Gilmore certainly does not. She is a class act that drinks out of vintage tea cups, and nothing less. She’s sophisticated, but also tries to stay current with literature, which leads her to reading a classic author like Ann Patchett. She even ordered a signed copy from Parnassus Books, Ann’s bookstore.

Richard Gilmore

Queue the tears. I refuse not to include the patriarch of the Gilmore family. Though he is no longer with us, I believe he’s somewhere drinking scotch and reading yet another classic, Proust perhaps? All the love to our fallen friend.

Luke Danes

Book: Arriving Today by Christopher Mims

We all know this guy isn’t drinking coffee, but you better believe he’s making his signature Luke’s coffee for his customers. No pumpkin spice, maple harvest blends here, folks. Taylor Doose already tried, and failed at that. It’s more likely that after hours, Luke is having nitwit juice (a beer) and reading a book about consumerism and online shopping, and likely is getting pretty heated about it.

Lane Kim

Book: The Night She Disappeared by Lisa Jewell

Coffee: Red Eye (brewed coffee with a shot of espresso) 

In classic Lane fashion, she’s drinking all of the caffeine to keep her energy up for that gig with the band later tonight. And, of course, what pairs better with a coffee buzz than the haunting jitters you feel when reading Lisa Jewell thrillers?! Lane reads EVERY novel from Lisa Jewell, and is obsessed with the twists and turns in each one. 

Paris Geller

Book: Reading? Paris isn’t reading. She’s writing her own biography. Not autobiography, no, a biography that she plans to publish under a pen name.
Coffee: Triple espresso

Even in her early days at Yale, Paris loved starting her mornings with a triple espresso. You will never find her having anything different.

Sookie St. James

Book: Seven Days in June by Tia Williams

Coffee: FINALLY, our pumpkin spice latte QUEEN! And you KNOW she can make the best ones herself. They are likely a fall favorite at the Dragonfly for all but Michel, who can only have milk with the blue cap.

Sookie wants to read all the steamy romance while drinking her PSL, and who can blame her? She loves a Reese’s Book Club pick, and she loves anything spicy. She’s heard a LOT of great things about it, and couldn’t wait to go buy a copy at the bookstore from Andrew. 

Kirk

Book: No books, just the Stars Hollow Gazette. He’s got to stay up on the town.

Coffee: Decaf only. The whole town is in on it. Anywhere he goes, no matter what blend he orders, Kirk is only given decaf.

Red white and blue book covers to read for Flag Day

The Wolf and the Woodsman by Ava Reid

In the vein of Naomi Novik’s New York Times bestseller Spinning Silver and Katherine Arden’s national bestseller The Bear and the Nightingale, this unforgettable debut— inspired by Hungarian history and Jewish mythology—follows a young pagan woman with hidden powers and a one-eyed captain of the Woodsmen as they form an unlikely alliance to thwart a tyrant.

Other People’s Children by R.J. Hoffmann

In Other People’s Children, three mothers make excruciating choices to protect their families and their dreams—choices that put them at decided odds against one another. You will root for each one of them and wonder just how far you’d go in the same situation. This riveting debut is a thoughtful exploration of love and family, and a heart-pounding page-turner you’ll find impossible to put down. 

We Are the Brennans by Tracey Lange

In the vein of Mary Beth Keane’s Ask Again, Yes and Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney’s The Nest, Tracey Lange’s We Are the Brennans explores the staying power of shame—and the redemptive power of love—in an Irish Catholic family torn apart by secrets.

Libertie by Kaitlyn Greenidge

Inspired by the life of one of the first Black female doctors in the United States and rich with historical detail, Kaitlyn Greenidge’s new novel resonates in our times and is perfect for readers of Brit Bennett, Min Jin Lee, and Yaa Gyasi. 

The Final Revival of Opal and Nev by Dawnie Walton

An electrifying novel about the meteoric rise of an iconic interracial rock duo in the 1970s, their sensational breakup, and the dark secrets unearthed when they try to reunite decades later for one last tour.

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner

Jo and Bethie Kaufman were born into a world full of promise. Growing up in 1950s Detroit, they live in a perfect “Dick and Jane” house, where their roles in the family are clearly defined. Jo is the tomboy, the bookish rebel with a passion to make the world more fair; Bethie is the pretty, feminine good girl, a would-be star who enjoys the power her beauty confers and dreams of a traditional life. But the truth ends up looking different from what the girls imagined. Jo and Bethie survive traumas and tragedies. As their lives unfold against the background of free love and Vietnam, Woodstock and women’s lib, Bethie becomes an adventure-loving wild child who dives headlong into the counterculture and is up for anything (except settling down). Meanwhile, Jo becomes a proper young mother in Connecticut, a witness to the changing world instead of a participant. Neither woman inhabits the world she dreams of, nor has a life that feels authentic or brings her joy. Is it too late for the women to finally stake a claim on happily ever after?

Blood Orange by Harriet Tyce

A disturbing, toxic and compelling novel that explores the power of fear and desire, jealousy and betrayal, love and hate, BLOOD ORANGE introduces a stunning new voice in psychological suspense.

The Shape of Thunder by Jasmine Warga

Cora hasn’t spoken to her best friend, Quinn, in a year. Despite living next door to each other, they exist in separate worlds of grief. Cora is still grappling with the death of her beloved sister in a school shooting, and Quinn is carrying the guilt of what her brother did. On the day of Cora’s twelfth birthday, Quinn leaves a box on her doorstep with a note. She has decided that the only way to fix things is to go back in time to the moment before her brother changed all their lives forever—and stop him.

Behind the Red Door by Megan Collins

The author of the “suspenseful, atmospheric, and completely riveting” (Megan Miranda, New York Times bestselling author) debut The Winter Sister returns with a darkly thrilling novel about a woman who comes to believe that she has a connection to a decades old kidnapping and now that the victim has gone missing again, begins a frantic search to learn what happened in the past.

Concrete Rose by Angie Thomas

International phenomenon Angie Thomas revisits Garden Heights seventeen years before the events of The Hate U Give in this searing and poignant exploration of Black boyhood and manhood.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland.

Sure, I’ll Be Your Black Friend by Ben Philippe

In the biting, hilarious vein of What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker and We Are Never Meeting in Real Life—comes Ben Philippe’s candid memoir-in-essays, chronicling a lifetime of being the Black friend (see also: foreign kid, boyfriend, coworker, student, teacher, roommate, enemy) in predominantly white spaces.

Miss Benson’s Beetle by Rachel Joyce

It is 1950. London is still reeling from World War II, and Margery Benson, a schoolteacher and spinster, is trying to get through life, surviving on scraps. One day, she reaches her breaking point, abandoning her job and small existence to set out on an expedition to the other side of the world in search of her childhood obsession: an insect that may or may not exist–the golden beetle of New Caledonia. When she advertises for an assistant to accompany her, the woman she ends up with is the last person she had in mind.

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory

A groomsman and his last-minute guest are about to discover if a fake date can go the distance in a fun and flirty debut novel.

Tokyo Ever After by Emiko Jean

Izumi Tanaka has never really felt like she fit in—it isn’t easy being Japanese American in her small, mostly white, northern California town. Raised by a single mother, it’s always been Izumi—or Izzy, because “It’s easier this way”—and her mom against the world. But then Izzy discovers a clue to her previously unknown father’s identity… and he’s none other than the Crown Prince of Japan. Which means outspoken, irreverent Izzy is literally a princess.

Big Girl, Small Town by Michelle Gallen

Meet Majella O’Neill, a heroine like no other, in this captivating Irish debut that has been called Milkman meets Derry Girls.

A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum

This debut novel by an Arab-American voice,takes us inside the lives of conservative Arab women living in America.

The Break Up Book Club by Wendy Wax

Breakups, like book clubs, come in many shapes and sizes and can take us on unexpected journeys as four women discover in this funny and heartwarming exploration of friendship from the USA Today bestselling author of Ten Beach Road and My Ex-Best Friend’s Wedding.

A Lowcountry Bride by Preslaysa Williams

When Derek begins to fall for the lovely Maya, he knows there’s no future. But destiny has its own plans, and these two lonely people with big hearts discover that coming home to love is the best gift life can give. 

The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo

Nghi Vo’s debut novel The Chosen and the Beautiful reinvents this classic of the American canon as a coming-of-age story full of magic, mystery, and glittering excess, and introduces a major new literary voice.

Meet Me in Another Life by Catriona Silvey

Like satellites trapped in orbit around each other, Thora and Santi are destined to meet again: as a teacher and prodigy student; a caretaker and dying patient; a cynic and a believer. In numerous lives they become friends, colleagues, lovers, and enemies. But as blurred memories and strange patterns compound, Thora and Santi come to a shocking revelation—they must discover the truth of their mysterious attachment before their many lives come to one, final end. 

Oligarchy by Scarlett Thomas

Hilariously dark, Oligarchy is The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie for the digital age. Scarlett Thomas captures the lives of privileged teenage girls seeking to be loved and accepted in all their triviality and magnitude. With the help of her diet-obsessed classmates, Tash must try to stay alive―and sane―while she uncovers what’s really going on.

Act Your Age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert

In Act Your Age, Eve Brown the flightiest Brown sister crashes into the life of an uptight B&B owner and has him falling hard—literally.

Infinite Country by Patricia Engel

For readers of Valeria Luiselli and Edwidge Danticat, an urgent and lyrical novel about a Colombian family fractured by deportation, offering an intimate perspective on an experience that so many have endured—and are enduring right now.

Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld

From the New York Times bestselling author of American Wife and Eligible, a novel that imagines a deeply compelling what-might-have-been: What if Hillary Rodham hadn’t married Bill Clinton?

What is Netgalley and why should I use it?

NetGalley helps publishers and authors promote digital review copies to book advocates and industry professionals. Publishers make digital review copies and audiobooks available for the NetGalley community to discover, request, read, and review.

We’ve put together some tips and tricks for anyone who is interested in reading books on Netgalley, so that you all can utilize this platform to its full potential, and of course to get as many approvals as possible!

  1. Fill out your profile completely
    Netgalley asks specific questions for your profile, and it’s of the utmost importance that you review and answer all of them. This will help publishers to notice you when they are reviewing your requests, and to make sure you are a legitimate reviewer.
  2. Provide links to your preferred platforms
    Some of us thrive on Instagram, others on TikTok. It’s important to share your preferred platforms with Netgalley so that no one has to do any guessing! If you were to look me up right now, you’d see a great following on Instagram, but my TikTok game is WEAK! What if that’s all they thought that I had for social media? I’d be doomed!
  3. Be sure to share your reading preferences!
    There are a lot of times that I receive emails based on my preferences, which is a great way for me to find books I hadn’t yet heard of, and even receive download links! If there’s a genre you know that you love, I highly recommend sharing that with the team at Netgalley – you might just get a sweet surprise!
  4. Check out each publisher’s approval preferences
    Each publisher is different! Some require a specific number of followers on social media, while others may prefer a high review percentage. Either way, it’s good to know so that you can increase your chances of being approved for books from your favorite publishing house.
  5. Keep up that review percentage!
    But really… my current percentage is… not ideal, and it shows in how many books I get approval for. Don’t be like me! Keep that review up to 80%, which is the recommendation of Netgalley. It DEFINITELY makes a difference. I know I’ve missed out on a number of books because of my low rate, and once you get stuck in the hole, it’s hard to dig your way out!
  6. “Read Now” books are especially great for beginners!
    If you are just starting out on Netgalley, the “read now” titles are a great way to get access to books, as well as to boost that review percentage!
  7. Don’t request too many books at once!
    It’s easy to get excited and request every book you see… and trust me, I’ve been there! But, it’s best to try and only request books you know you can prioritize on that never-ending TBR of yours…
  8. Keep your profile updated
    Make sure to update your stats as you have more followers or your reading preferences change! If you mark the date you last updated your numbers, it will let publishers know that you’re staying current.
  9. HAVE FUN!
    Netgalley is such a great opportunity for book lovers and educators alike – enjoy your access! 🙂

Why are romance novels most commonly published in paperback?

Ever wonder why romance novels are always published in paperback? During quarantine, I’ve been reading a LOT of romance, and every time I get a new romance novel from the bookstore or a publisher, I noticed they’re always published as paperback. Typically, when a book is first published, they’re produced as hardcover. Hardcover books are more expensive, and can drive a higher profit for publishers in the first six months to a year of a book’s life. It’s after that point that publishers will continue printing the book, but in paperback.

But why is romance different? Why do these books begin their careers as paperback books as opposed to the more expensive and higher quality hardcover?

The short answer is DEMAND. Historically, romance has been the best-selling genre of books in existence. Of course, this fluctuates and changes, and in recent years, we’ve seen an increase in true crime and thriller genres — but from a standpoint of how the industry started, romance was always the highest in demand. Paperbacks are not only cheaper to produce, but they are also easier. So when romance novels were flying off of the shelves, it made sense to get them into the hands of readers as quickly (and cheaply) as possible.

Mass-market paperback novels are also extremely popular in the romance genre. Mass-market paperback novels are the kind you can find for $5 to $10 at airport, grocery stores, etc. They’re often much smaller and more compact than the average paperback. Perfect for tossing in your purse or on-the-go reading! I’ve bought them before simply because they’re the biggest bang for my buck, though admittedly they hurt my eyes!

Notice where they are sold … they’re sold in places that are most convenient to their target audience; middle-aged women. They’re also sold at an affordable price that can act as an add on to any order. I’ve personally been guilty of adding one to my cart at Target simply because it didn’t make that big of a dent in the grocery list, and I doubted that my husband would even notice.

So there you have it; our consistent and constant demand of these spicy, salacious stories are what make them produced at such an affordable price, even right out of the gate. A huge thanks to the publishers for giving us fresh, affordable titles — we see you, and appreciate you for looking out for us and our grocery shopping!

Finished Bridgerton and need something else to read?

If you’re anything like me, you’re finding yourself HOOKED on the latest Netflix craze, Bridgerton. This period show was based off of the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn, and the books are becoming increasingly harder to find on bookstore shelves. These are unprecedented times we are in, and I personally am loving the historical romance. It’s keeping me occupied and entertained during these long days of quarantine, and I need MORE MORE MORE! So, if you’re a fan of Bridgerton, here are some other titles you might want to check out: 

Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore (A League of Extraordinary Women #1)

A stunning debut for author Evie Dunmore and her Oxford Rebels, in which a fiercely independent vicar’s daughter takes on a duke in a fiery love story that threatens to upend the British social order. This is a newer series by the brilliant Evie Dunmore. The second book in the series, A Rogue of One’s Own, just came out in 2020. Her next book will be out this year – stay tuned!

A Princess in Theory by Alyssa Cole (Reluctant Royals #1)

Between grad school and multiple jobs, Naledi Smith doesn’t have time for fairy tales…or patience for the constant emails claiming she’s betrothed to an African prince. But, when Naledi mistakes the prince for a pauper, Prince Thabiso can’t resist the chance to experience life—and love—without the burden of his crown. The chemistry between them is instant and irresistible, and flirty friendship quickly evolves into passionate nights. But when the truth is revealed, can a princess in theory become a princess ever after?

Secrets of a Summer Night by Lisa Kleypas (Wallflowers #1)

Four young ladies at the side of the ballroom make a pact to help each other find husbands…no matter what it takes. Another great historical romance series to cozy up by the fire with!

Destiny’s Embrace by Beverly Jenkins (Destiny #1)

With Destiny’s Embrace, Jenkins brings readers back to the American West, where Logan Yates, a self-important ranch owner, must confront his feelings for his beautiful, free spirited housekeeper, Mariah Cooper. While they bicker incessantly, their sexual tension is palpable, and only rises when Mariah’s former lover arrives on the scene. Will she accept Logan’s heart?

Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake by Sarah Maclean (Love by Numbers #1)

A lady does not smoke cheroot. She does not ride astride. She does not fence or attend duels. She does not fire a pistol, and she never gambles at a gentlemen’s club… but this lady has vowed to break the rules. A spicy series with a strong female protagonist … sign me up! Sidenote: the audio is said to be amazing for this one! 

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Not since Jane Eyre has a heroine faced such difficulty with the Other Woman. An international bestseller that has never gone out of print, Rebecca is the haunting story of a young girl consumed by love and the struggle to find her identity. This is a #bookstagrammademedoit title that I’ve seen floating around quite a bit, and it has exceptional ratings on Goodreads. Though it is a standalone, it might just keep you entertained for the time being! 

The Duchess War  by Courtney Milan (Brothers Sinister #1)

Sometimes love is an accident. This time, it’s a strategy. Miss Minerva Lane is a quiet, bespectacled wallflower, and she wants to keep it that way. So when a handsome duke comes to town, the last thing she wants is his attention. But that is precisely what she gets. Because Robert Blaisdell, the Duke of Clermont, is not fooled. When Minnie figures out what he’s up to, he realizes there is more to her than her spectacles and her quiet ways. And he’s determined to lay her every secret bare before she can discover his. But this time, one shy miss may prove to be more than his match…

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (Outlander #1)

The year is 1945. Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is just back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon when she walks through a standing stone in one of the ancient circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach—an “outlander”—in a Scotland torn by war and raiding border clans in the year of Our Lord…1743. Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire is catapulted into the intrigues of lairds and spies that may threaten her life, and shatter her heart. For here James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, shows her a love so absolute that Claire becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire—and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives. Admittedly, I’ve never read the Outlander series, but I might need to now! I recently read Kindred by Octavia Butler and really loved the back-and-forth timeline, which it sounds like exists here. I’m definitely intrigued and given the size of the first book alone, I think these could get me through the winter!

Have other recommendations to add to this list? Be sure to contact me at elysse@booksforward.com. Happy reading!