Eight bookish podcasts to check out on International Podcast Day!

Happy International Podcast Day! As readers, we don’t just read books — we also participate in tons of extracurricular activities involving books. We talk about books, join book clubs, look for great reviews, and writte as well.

One of the biggest ways we discuss books is through podcasts, and not only are there shows about specific books, but there are podcasts on books for your radar, book club podcasts, and even writing podcasts for authors. There’s a little bit for every reader and author on this list, so I hope you give one a listen.

All the Books at Book Riot

If you want to keep up with what’s new and cool in the bookish world, then All the Books from Book Riot is your go-to. With new episodes every week, the hosts share what’s new and trendy that’s being published. With expert recommendations, you’ll definitely keep abreast of what’s publishing at all times.

The Stacks Podcast

If you’re looking to join a book club without the stress of going to meetings, hearing expert author interviews, or discovering books you may not have heard before, then The Stacks Podcast may be the one for you. Offering everything you’d need to be as prolific a reader as you can be, the Stacks Podcast hosted by Traci Thomas has it all.

The Maris Review

If you’re a fan of listening to author interviews, then this is the podcast for you. Hosted by Maris Kreizman, the podcast features some incredible authors of today, includes exciting topics to discuss, and learning a little bit about the authors we all so love and adore.

Minorities in Publishing

Unlike the other podcasts on this list, Minorities in Publishing discusses the deeper and wider expanse of publishing. Specifically, it discusses the diversity (or lack thereof) in publishing, sharing interviews with publishing experts and authors and their experiences within the publishing industry.

Deadline City

Hosted by YA authors Zoraida Cordova and Dhonielle Clayton, get a look into the process of creating a book, expert author interviews, and learning what it’s like to be a popular writer! If you’re an author trying to get your book going, this podcast may give you the encouragement you need.

Beyond the Trope

If you’re a fan of SFF books, then this is the podcast for you. With interviews from today’s greatest SFF authors, you’ll not only find new books to read but completely unraptured by why these authors wrote these books. It’s a great way to dive deeper into the writing process, especially for those massive SFF worlds.

Black Chick Lit

If you’re looking for more diversity in your reading life, check out Black Chick Lit. This bi-monthly podcast covers not only books written by Black women, but also about Black women. Discussing some of the latest novels from BIPOC authors, these two intrepid hosts dive deep into the themes and stories that shape Black women’s narrative in modern literature.

Books and Boba

If you’re looking for a book club that focuses on the Asian American community and experience, look no further than to Books and Boba. With monthly book picks, author chats, and more, the hosts of Books and Boba covers all things coming out from Asian and Asian American authors. Find some great new reads, listen to some interesting author conversations and immerse yourself in the world of Asian American writing.

Did your book’s publication date shift? Here’s why that’s OK

I, for one, hate change. I’m a planner and a list-maker, and switching gears makes me dizzy. Checklists, deadlines and color-coded markers are the backbone of our society, sure, but when plans change, it’s better to adapt than to fight it out.

Why do publication dates change?

Publication dates can shift for a variety of reasons. However, it’s important to keep in mind that in every case, your team may suggest a date change because they believe your release would be more successful on a different day. Your team knows that publishing a book is more often a marathon than a sprint. While detours may add a mile or two to the journey, they can also better prepare you for crossing the finish line.

Here are a few common reasons for moving a book’s release date:

Production Delays: From editing and designing to printing and shipping ARCs, a lot of work goes into production, and there are often several eyes and hands working on a book all at once. A thorough publishing process opens up the possibility for delays. Editors often factor time into their schedule for a few things to go wrong. Even so, if a snag is hit in one department, it may cause others to fall behind too.

Unforeseen Circumstances: The pandemic is one of the most monumental unforeseen circumstances we’ve encountered in a while. Due to its impact on travel, many books that had planned in-person book tours had to adjust their schedules. To see some of the hundreds of altered publication dates, check out this spreadsheet from Publishers Weekly.

Competition for Media Attention: Say the planned publication date for your book was set for Election Day, or a similarly newsworthy date. As the day approaches, and you realize the impending media frenzy, your team may decide to move your release date out in order to give it a better shot at securing publicity.

Catching the Trend Wave: Book releases can also shift to earlier dates on the calendar! Typically, this is because your team is looking to capitalize on a seasonal or topically relevant trend that would help your book reach a larger audience.

How to make your date change work for you

If you haven’t begun promoting the book yet, it will be relatively easy to make a radical change, should you choose to do so. You can switch from a summer release to a fall one, for example, which was the route many publishers chose in light of the pandemic.

Or, if you’re simply recovering from a small production delay, your date may only shift back one or two weeks. In any case, let your publicist know about your date change ASAP, if they aren’t already in the know. This will be important as they begin to create press materials and organize their outreach to the media.

What if promotion has already begun using the old date?

If you’ve already begun promoting the book, a date change may feel a bit more stressful. Rest assured, though, it’s still manageable!

First, you’ll need to let your publicity team know ASAP about the new date. Your publicist may need to update interested media contacts, and they’ll want to have the correct information for their pitching moving forward.

Plan to spread the word of your date change on social media–here is where a pinned tweet may come in handy! A pinned tweet allows you to showcase one tweet at the top of your profile page, so it won’t get buried at the bottom of your feed over time. Pinning a tweet about your date change will make sure that it stays on your readers’ radars. If you’ve never pinned a tweet before, here are some helpful tips from Business Insider.

Also, be sure to make any necessary changes to your website and Twitter and Facebook banners. You may need to have new graphics made accordingly.

If you are using an email newsletter to keep friends, family, and fans updated, you should send out a special announcement of the date change as well.

What if readers forget about my book or lose interest due to the delay?

This is a valid concern, but it’s equally possible for the delay to translate into added anticipation for the release!

When in doubt, get creative: ask yourself what you can offer to readers that will be sure to keep your book on the forefront of their minds. This will likely look different for every author depending on your audience’s needs, but here are a few options to get you started:

You can plan a special giveaway in the interim, such as offering free signed bookplates to your audience. Or, you can set up a FB Live chat for your would-be pub day, where you play a few games and answer questions from your followers.

In the end, publication days may change, but our love for a good book never will.

 

Why are romance novels most commonly published in paperback?

Ever wonder why romance novels are always published in paperback? During quarantine, I’ve been reading a LOT of romance, and every time I get a new romance novel from the bookstore or a publisher, I noticed they’re always published as paperback. Typically, when a book is first published, they’re produced as hardcover. Hardcover books are more expensive, and can drive a higher profit for publishers in the first six months to a year of a book’s life. It’s after that point that publishers will continue printing the book, but in paperback.

But why is romance different? Why do these books begin their careers as paperback books as opposed to the more expensive and higher quality hardcover?

The short answer is DEMAND. Historically, romance has been the best-selling genre of books in existence. Of course, this fluctuates and changes, and in recent years, we’ve seen an increase in true crime and thriller genres — but from a standpoint of how the industry started, romance was always the highest in demand. Paperbacks are not only cheaper to produce, but they are also easier. So when romance novels were flying off of the shelves, it made sense to get them into the hands of readers as quickly (and cheaply) as possible.

Mass-market paperback novels are also extremely popular in the romance genre. Mass-market paperback novels are the kind you can find for $5 to $10 at airport, grocery stores, etc. They’re often much smaller and more compact than the average paperback. Perfect for tossing in your purse or on-the-go reading! I’ve bought them before simply because they’re the biggest bang for my buck, though admittedly they hurt my eyes!

Notice where they are sold … they’re sold in places that are most convenient to their target audience; middle-aged women. They’re also sold at an affordable price that can act as an add on to any order. I’ve personally been guilty of adding one to my cart at Target simply because it didn’t make that big of a dent in the grocery list, and I doubted that my husband would even notice.

So there you have it; our consistent and constant demand of these spicy, salacious stories are what make them produced at such an affordable price, even right out of the gate. A huge thanks to the publishers for giving us fresh, affordable titles — we see you, and appreciate you for looking out for us and our grocery shopping!

What are bookplates, and do readers and authors use them?

What are bookplates and how can I use them?

 

Have you ever loaned someone a well-loved copy of your favorite book, only to never lay eyes on that book ever again? Have you decided that generosity is futile because no one understands the deep personal attachment you have with your books? Yeah, me too.

I still cringe when I think about loaning a friend my copy of “The Fault in Our Stars” in middle school. As I handed over the book, she asked me, Can I use highlighter in this? The audacity.

Well, bookplates were invented to solve this problem by documenting the personal relationship you have with your book and ensuring that everyone knows this book belongs to you. Are bookplates passive aggressive? Maybe, depending on who you ask.

But they can also be a fun way for an author to personalize their book for readers, even during a pandemic, and can create a unique experience that will leave them eagerly awaiting your next release.

A Brief History

A bookplate, sometimes called an ex libris plate, is a label that is affixed inside a book. Traditionally, bookplates were used to indicate ownership, and historians have found evidence of bookplates being used in Ancient Egypt and Europe during the Middle Ages. Prior to the advent of the printing press in the 15th-century, books were rare and extremely valuable, so it was important to mark ownership in case a book was lost or stolen–but whether or not a bookplate actually resulted in more books being returned to their owner is unknown.

It’s safe to say that early iterations of the bookplate were more practical than ornamental. Later on, however, these inscriptions developed into elaborate artistic expressions, as wealthy patrons commissioned designs from famous contemporary artists. Take a look at this bookplate designed by Albrecht Dürer (circa the late 15th or early 16th century) from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/387572

Since bookplates were primarily used to reflect ownership, they often included a family crest or coat of arms. Artists sometimes inscribed these by hand or made a woodcut or engraving to transfer their designs, as Dürer is known for.

Nowadays, bookplates are usually affixed to the inside cover or front matter using a sticker or a stamp. Bookplates have also taken on a variety of uses. They are still widely used to indicate ownership, but they can also be used to display an author’s signature or otherwise personalize a book.

An Author’s Signature

Adding a signature to a book helps to bridge the gap between the author and the reader. The personal connections made during a book event or book signing can turn even a casual reader into a lifelong fan of an author’s work.

Although the current pandemic has halted many in-person gatherings, book signings have thankfully continued on through the use of bookplates!

Bookplates are a safe way for authors to send their signature to anyone, from booksellers to fans, while abiding by social distancing measures. If you can’t meet someone in person to sign their book, sending a signed bookplate their way is a great alternative.

An author might also choose to sign bookplates for efficiency if they are signing a number of books all at once for a bookstore, book club, or other large event.

Here are some examples of authors using bookplates in recent months (be sure to follow each of these authors on Twitter for more updates!)

Sara Sligar: https://twitter.com/saraxsligar/status/1264245770582028289

Maggie Stiefvater: https://twitter.com/mstiefvater/status/1361431121486114819

Adam Silvera: https://twitter.com/AdamSilvera/status/1361392998496440322

Publicity Plan

At this point, you may be wondering, how can bookplates become a part of my publicity plan? When do I use them and who should I send them to?

Bookplates are especially useful when paired with virtual events. You can offer to send signed bookplates to a bookstore in advance of an event, ensuring that each attendee has access to a signed copy.

Not only does this benefit attendees who now have access to personalized books, but this also helps build a good relationship with your local bookseller. Bookplates can be used as an incentive to encourage attendees to buy their books from their local store instead of from Amazon, in the spirit of a shop-local campaign!

You can also offer to send signed bookplates as a free gift for fans who pre-order a copy of the book. Ask fans to DM or email their receipt to you, and then mail them a bookplate with a personal note thanking them for their support.

Additionally, bookplates can be used as an exclusive perk for a giveaway. A bookplate giveaway can be held in conjunction with a virtual event or on social media, just for fun!

Get Creative!

Although traditionally bookplates have been used in a limited number of ways, the possibilities are truly endless. There are plenty of unexpected ways to personalize books for readers, and to make your book stand out from the crowd.

Some authors, like David Sedaris, add drawings or sketches to accompany their signature. These drawings often relate to a specific meaning within the book, operating like an inside joke or a teaser for what’s to come.

Another author recently took this idea and turned it up a few notches. Will Maclean, author of “The Apparition Phase” created a unique and memorable publicity campaign by personalizing copies of his book in a way no one has seen before.

Maclean signed 1000 copies of his book, but made things a bit more interesting by “hiding” a 1000-word short story within these copies. Each book contained one word from the story, as well as a number (ranging from 1 to 1000) indicating its position within the story. When all 1000 words are arranged in the correct order, the short story will be revealed.

This tactic turned readers into eager detectives, hoping to string all the words together. Fans flocked to Twitter, sharing each word that was included within their signed copy and keeping track of progress. 

https://twitter.com/lovedreadinthis/status/1331611138711285760

At the end of the day, bookplates are all about showing readers and booksellers that you care. They help to create a heartfelt memory for the reader which will have them reluctant to loan their copy of your book out to anyone – even their closest friends!

 

Why do virtual events have higher attendance but lower sales?

 

After a monumental shift to hosting 2020 author events online, many bookstores reported that attendance for virtual events is higher (sometimes much higher) than for physical book events–but event-related sales are way down.

In fact, during a briefing at the SIBA/NAIBA trade show in September 2020, Brooklyn bookstore Greenlight Books (who had hosted 150+ virtual events since March!) shared that one event drew 80 online attendees, but they only sold 12 books. And this rate is actually above average: many booksellers are reporting an average sales conversion of 10% for virtual events. So what’s happening?

There could be any number of reasons for this, but one intriguing possibility revolves around active vs. passive investment.

It takes effort to attend a physical event: you have to get ready (even if you just put on your shoes), travel to the venue, potentially spend money on fuel or food while you’re out, and spend at least a couple of hours outside of your home. That’s active investment; you’ve put work into being in that space, and this increases your stake in what you “take away” from the event at the end of the night, whether intangible (general enjoyment) or tangible (a book or other purchase).

Subtle social pressures may also influence sales at physical events: the signing and sales are public, and choosing to buy–or not buy–the book may feel “noticed” by other attendees, booksellers, or the author. At physical events, you have an opportunity to connect with an author directly, and even this brief interaction can create a positive impression, even a feeling of “relationship,” that incentivizes you to support the author with a book purchase.

Contrast this to a virtual event, where there’s no expectation to dress to “go out,” no travel is required, and you can turn off your video and “disappear” from the event at any point without scrutiny. This is more passive investment. You can’t peruse store shelves, or mingle with other participants in a physical space. The bar to attendance is lower than ever–but “attending” is not the same thing as engaging.

In addition, the instant gratification of the book signing a challenge. At traditional author events, attendees who buy a book during the event leave with it in-hand. Physical book signings also enable readers to have direct, personalized experiences with authors. Not so with virtual events: Book plates and mass-signed stock don’t have the same personalized feeling, and waiting on a book delivery is not as satisfying as leaving with it. A lack of physical connection and instant gratification also contribute to lower sales and event engagement.

During virtual events, book sales are handled privately and not publicly, and (much like any online shopping experience) passive investment, distraction, apathy, lack of peer pressure, and even the subtle inconvenience of writing in your payment/shipping details can result in fewer purchases.

Virtual events have lowered the bar for participation, which dramatically increases attendance — but not sales. It’s important to understand that, for the time being at least, online events revolve less around sales and more around:

  1. pure necessity (as some stores just aren’t able to physically reopen right now),
  2. enabling participants to join regardless of location (meaning you now have a better chance of working with bookstores that aren’t necessarily “local,” and involving nonlocal participants from around the world), and
  3. engaging with your audience in fresh new ways.

Online events are still your time to shine. Even if there’s not an immediate sales boost, increased attendance and exposure during virtual events can have a positive impact on growing your readership, relationships, and sales long-term. So if you’re wondering if you should participate in virtual events, the answer is a resounding: yes! Understanding the challenges and opportunities of this unique virtual space will help you set better expectations, get creative, and strategize how to best invest your own time and energy during your event!

Relax and read with an ambiance room


My focus has been a little … scattered in recent months. But one thing that has helped me concentrate is ambiance rooms! These videos are usually a scene or several scenes that run for hours. You can keep them on the in background — some have music, and some are just accompanied by light sounds from the visuals around the site, but all of them are calming.

Whether you are trying to sit down and read or work or just sit with your thoughts for a few minutes, we’ve collected some of our favorite rooms for to you to relax in!

  1. My personal favorite place to virtually visit? The Shire. Just the thought of visiting Bilbo in his little house under the hill and having a cup of tea makes me sigh with relief.
  2. Even though we can’t go work in a coffee shop in person right now, you can recreate a similar vibe with some light jazz and the pitter patter of rain. 
  3. Want to take a quick trip to Scotland with Jamie Fraser (who doesn’t)? Check out this video with babbling brooks and Outlander music
  4. If someone asked me my ideal writing situation, I would simply show them this vibrant desk set up in front of gently falling autumn leaves with the sound of wind chimes in the background.
  5. And if I could read anywhere, I’d choose to settle in among these magnificent stacks with a thunderstorm pounding at the windows.
  6. Or perhaps I’ll take a quick jaunt through the wardrobe to visit the peaceful winter woods of Narnia under a blanket of snow.
  7. If being indoors in winter is more of your thing, settle in by the fireplace and let the crackling wood and flickering candles relax you. 
  8. Need some alone time? Try this scene of nighttime in the mountains under the stars with the chirps of crickets and no one else around for miles.
  9. Or if a tropical getaway is what you’re looking for, escape to this bookstore on an island — the quiet background noises are so soothing.
  10. And, of course, there’s the classic sound of waves crashing on the shore under palm trees that is sure to bring you peace.

Loving a bookstore from afar

a book with bookmarks from various independent bookstoresVisiting local independent bookstores is one of my favorite parts of a vacation (it’s literally the first thing I plan after deciding on a destination), but since travel plans are on hiatus for the foreseeable future, I’ve been spreading the love by buying books from different stores around the country. Even though I’ve never stepped inside these storefronts literally, they still have my heart.

And since many places are fighting for their businesses to stay open throughout the pandemic, I’m getting an early start on Christmas shopping by purchasing books and gift cards for everyone (sorry friends and family to ruin the surprise — although, you had to know).

It’s also been a lot of fun to check out the virtual events they have scheduled — I would never be able to see this many authors in other circumstances, so that’s been a bit of a silver lining!

Here are some of the indies I’ve fallen for virtually in recent months:

  1. The Raven Book Store in Lawrence, Kansas
  2. BookPeople in Austin, Texas
  3. Mahogany Books in Washington, D.C.
  4. Women & Children First in Chicago, Illinois
  5. Frugal Bookstore in Roxbury, Massachusetts
  6. Third Street Books in McMinnville, Oregon
  7. Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, Michigan
  8. The Lit. Bar in The Bronx, New York
  9. Old Town Books in Alexandria, Virginia
  10. The Bookshelf in Thomasville, Georgia

Bonus tip: If you ask, bookstores often send you a bookmark from their store with your book purchase, which makes for a cool and useful collection!

How to make the most of the 2020 SIBA/NAIBA Trade Show

Books Forward is so excited for the SIBA/NAIBA Trade Show starting Sept. 21 — check out our exhibitor booth here: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/books-forward/! This year’s trade show is going to look a little different from previous years: for the first time ever, SIBA and NAIBA have partnered up to host a virtual, five-day event. We can’t wait to join our favorite indie booksellers, publishers, and authors online for this one-of-a-kind experience — and we also know that new opportunities can create questions for our authors. Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the trade show to help authors navigate this year’s especially unique event with ease!

What does the SIBA/NAIBA Trade Show look like?
Held Sept. 21-25, the trade show will consist of a series of Zoom events taking place across four different channels. It’s a joint event hosted between SIBA (the Southern Independent Booksellers Association) and NAIBA (the New Atlantic Booksellers Association), united under the name New Voices New Rooms. Booksellers will be eyeing new and upcoming book releases!

What does this year’s schedule look like?
You can find the trade show schedule here: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/schedule/. It’s divided into four tracks: Education (panels, roundtables, and more for booksellers), Author Events, Publisher Events, and Networking. It’s interactive and searchable; you can add all events, or just individual events, to your personal calendar; you can subscribe to it; and you can easily share it on social media. You’ll also find all of the participating publishers tagged — just click on the publisher’s name to see all of the events that publisher is participating in.

This schedule is pretty extensive! How will I know what’s happening each day?
Not only is the schedule broken up by day, but the New Voices New Rooms blog will also have a rundown of each day’s events, and is a great hub for finding out info about the show: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/nvnr-news/. Their newsletter will also recap daily sessions and events, as will the SIBA and NAIBA newsletters, respectively.

How many people can attend the online trade show?
There is no attendance cap; there are more than 500 booksellers and other industry attendees registered right now.

Can I still arrange to be featured in an author event?
The Author Events schedule is full, but there are still some advertising options available to reach attendees via the email newsletter or trade show website, which is sure to have high traffic during that week! Find more info here: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/sponsors/.

Do I have to register?
Anyone who is participating in the trade show (including exhibitors) or who wants to attend must register; you can do so here: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/registration/. Registering gets you onto the list of people allowed into the Zoom rooms/events.

If my publisher/editor/representative got me scheduled to participate in a trade show author event, do I still have to register?
Anyone who is attending or participating in the trade show must be registered for the event; this is how you get on to the list of Zoom room attendees. However, it’s possible that SIBA/NAIBA registered you on behalf of your publisher/editor/representative; it’s best to check with your participating organization to make sure.

I am, or my publisher/representative is, participating in the trade show. How will ARCs/galleys/review copies of my book be available?
If an author is featured at an event, New Voices New Rooms will send a Google form to all session participants at the end of the event to incentivize people to sign up for copies; publishers will then receive a list with all the book requests. Exhibitors can also feature galley request forms on their pages in the Virtual Exhibitor Hall!

What is the Virtual Exhibitor Hall?
While we may miss the crowded and bustling exhibitor halls of previous years, New Voices New Rooms has created a really excellent Virtual Hall for Exhibitors, which you can peruse here: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/virtual-exhibit-hall/. When you hover your cursor over each logo, the digital placard flips over to reveal a sentence or two about that exhibitor. Click on the logo to “enter” the exhibitor’s virtual booth, where you can learn more about their offerings and services, and even enter an online raffle! There’s also a searchable directory of exhibitors in the dropdown menu between the sponsor logos and exhibitor logos.

How do I know which booksellers are in attendance?
New Voices New Rooms has created a pretty awesome searchable list of all registered booksellers who will be in attendance — check it out here! https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/booksellers/

Will I be tagged on social media?
New Voices New Rooms is creating graphics and videos that can be shared on social media by publishers and exhibitors; each piece of content will include a list of participating authors’ social media handles so they can be easily tagged online. This is perfect for promoting and sharing specific authors and events!

Books Forward Welcomes SIBA / NAIBA Attendees to New Orleans

Bienvenue to all SIBA / NAIBA indie booksellers and other lovers of literature! At Books Forward, we are passionate about elevating important messages and stories from diverse voices, as well as championing independent bookstores. And we are so excited to extend our Southern hospitality to the attendees of 2020’s joint SIBA / NAIBA tradeshow! Welcome, y’all!

If you want to discover some incredible new authors, enjoy some fun NOLA swag, or receive a free consultation about boosting your social media presence, check out what we have in store for you this year. Connect with us during the conference by participating in a few of our offerings below: 

Visit our virtual booth in the exhibitor’s hall: https://newvoicesnewrooms.org/books-forward/ 

Check out our booth and come meet the amazing Southern authors and books we’re representing this year! You may request galleys for any of our titles.

Ask us for a free social media consultation 

Are you a bookseller looking to boost your social media presence? Our digital marketing team will review your social media accounts and offer constructive feedback and advice for increasing your online engagement, hosting virtual events and bringing more patrons to your online store! Email us at info@booksforward.com to schedule your consult.

You may also be interested in scheduling some of our authors and leading experts for free (live or pre-recorded) virtual learning opportunities.

Learn New Orleans lingo 

Think you know how to say “Tchefuncte,” “Vieux Carre,” “Ouachita” and “Burgundy?” Think again! Let our New Orleans team teach you how to pronounce the trickier words you’ll see while virtually visiting the Big Easy, and we’ll have you speaking like a local in no time. Laissez les bon temps rouler!

Pick up some fun swag 

We have a present for you! Check your conference box to snag your grab bag of NOLA flavor, including a snazzy sticker and (of course) a fun Mardi Gras bead courtesy of Books Forward! 

Meet our authors face-to-face

Our authors want to say a big “thank you!” to indies and share some cool news with you via video! Check out Big Freedia’s (New Orleans’ one and only Queen Diva and Bounce music icon) shout-out to indie booksellers, bestselling author Rea Frey talking about the importance of indie bookstores, bestselling author Jenny Milchman (known for what Shelf Awareness called the “World’s Longest Bookstore Tour”) reading from her newest thriller, and Washington Post journalist and Jeff Goldblum biographer Travis Andrews sharing some fascinating facts about “Jurassic Jeff”.

Join us on social media 

Be the first to enter our giveaways (often for indie bookstore gift cards, but also for other literary themed gifts!), get tagged in our shout-outs, chat with us online, and see our posts, streams, and stories during the tradeshow and beyond! Follow us on social media by clicking the links below: 

A sincere THANK YOU for all you do for the literary community. We’re sending a big virtual hug your way!

“Help Me Help You!” Tips for your family and friends who want to help your writing career

So many authors are reluctant to ask their family, friends and assorted contacts for help when they are promoting their book, but I always tell them to think of it from the opposite perspective. Wouldn’t you want to support a friend or loved one who had a new book coming out?

The thing is, most people don’t know exactly how to show that support, and they just need a little nudge in the right direction. So we put together a handy guide you can pass along when someone asks, “How can I help?”

Dear friends and family, here’s how you can help the authors in your life:

  1. Preorder a copy of their book — and not just for yourselves, but for others. Everybody’s getting a copy for Christmas! This is the most tangible way to help. For those who don’t have the financial means to order several books, there are a lot of other things that can help.
  2. Talk about the book on social media. Include links to the author’s website so people can order copies for themselves. Follow the author on their social media pages, and share their posts as appropriate to help drum up excitement.
  3. Rate and review the book on all platforms possible. Amazon doesn’t allow reviews before a book’s publication date, but Goodreads and other sites do. These ratings can be a deciding factor for whether someone buys the book or not. Seeing even just a handful of positive reviews can be a big incentive to check it out, so leaving a 5-star rating and review is an easy way to have a critical impact.
  4. Add the book to Goodreads lists to boost its SEO (Search Engine Optimization) power. When someone searches for books about specific topics — for example, “books about teenage witches” — Goodreads lists are often among the first results to pop up. By adding the book to several topical/thematic Goodreads lists and asking others to vote on it, you are making it more visible to its targeted readers.
  5. Suggest it as a book club pick to any groups you’re involved with who may enjoy it. The author may even be able to do a virtual Q&A with book clubs if that’s something you’d be interested in.
  6. Request that your local library carry the book. Check to see if the book is available at your library. If it’s not, check online to see if they have a form on their website where you can request that they carry the book. Many libraries have request forms specifically for this purpose (and if yours does not have an online form, a conversation with the librarian is a good place to start!). If the library chooses to carry the book, they will purchase a copy (another sale for the author!), and the book will be able to reach a new audience of readers who may not hear about it otherwise.
  7. Talk to your local booksellers and see if they know about the book. If not, give them an elevator pitch! Their recommendations are invaluable, so even putting the book on their radar can be helpful.
  8. And of course, spread the word! Word of mouth is still so important. Talk about the book to your friends, your coworkers, in your personal and professional circles, anywhere you can. Being an advocate for the author in your life is truly a gift — and you may help your other friends and connections discover a great new read!