Bookstagrammers to follow for National Science Fiction Day

Science fiction gives us an avenue of escape and a view of a possible future. I think sometimes people can be intimidated by the genre or think it’s nerdy, but there’s a sci fi book out there for everyone! I added my own recommendation at the end, because these are some of my favorite books to read and I will take any opportunity to push Becky Chambers on people.

  1. Becky (@basiclandcave) says: “One of my go-to recommendations for science fiction fans is Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee. It’s the first in an extraordinary queer space opera trilogy filled with high stakes intrigue, creative magical technologies, and the best characters. It takes some investment to get started with this uncommon novel, but the payoff is more than worthwhile.”
  2. Erin (@erins_library) recommends The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson. “I recommend this book for many reasons, but would ask you to read it for the twists alone. There’s a special place in my heart for books about the multiverse and interdimensional travel. And this book serves as a great platform to discuss and explore classicism, segregation, racism, exploitation and poverty.”
  3. Bezi (@beingabookwyrm) says: “My pick is Escaping Exodus by Nicky Drayden — the worldbuilding of space beasts in which human societies now live is entirely unique, and I was so intrigued by the depiction of this society’s space matriarchy that centers Black women. It’s a bit gory at times, but I definitely recommend this epic space opera of class politics and star-crossed friends-to-lovers.”
  4. Katy (@theshriekingstack) says: “These days I’m a science fiction and fantasy enthusiast, but before I experienced N.K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth trilogy (starting with The Fifth Season), I wasn’t interested in SFF at all. Jemisin tackles racial, social, and environmental politics on a continent ravaged by climate disaster. She takes a nuanced route to dealing with issues that parallel our own world in a way that takes into account the complexities of human conditioning, inequality, and oppression. Realizing that SFF offered such gems as these and could not only include but focus on characters from marginalized backgrounds changed the entire way I looked at the genre. The Broken Earth is a stunning feat of imagination with unparalleled worldbuilding and mythology and a multi-faceted exploration of finding yourself in a world that doesn’t see you as human.”
  5. Erin (@roostercalls) recommends The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz. “If you like your time travel stories historically contextualized, socially aware, and a little bit punk rock, Annalee Newitz has got a magical wish-granting piece of fiction for you.   In addition to being straight-up fantastic writing, The Future of Another Timeline is also fiercely feminist, and was the galvanizing reminder I needed in 2020 that resistance matters — that a better world is worth fighting for and can be won.”
  6. Kim (@runoutofpages) recommends Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes. “There’s nothing I love more than a good space opera. Chilling Effect (and the sequel Prime Deceptions) has a strong heroine, a sexy love interest, a fantastic crew, lots of action, too many geeky easter eggs to name, and plenty of laughs.”
  7. Casey (@caseythereader) recommends Octavia E. Butler’s Lilith’s Brood trilogy. “A crew of humans wake up to find themselves on an alien ship, where the aliens are planning to save humanity and expand their alien empire by integrating themselves – mating – with the humans. This series is an extended examination of what it means to be human, both on the literal genetic level and on a cultural and emotional level. It’s engrossing and terrifying and thought-provoking; a true classic of the genre.”
  8. Cristina Marie (@2bookornot2book) recommends Vanished Birds by Simon Jimenez. “It’s a beautiful, sweeping science fiction debut that centers around the love people have for each other, whether that is romantic, friendly or familial. It’s a story about the importance of music and the magic of space and science, and the deeply important value of chosen found family. It’s one of my favorite books I’ve ever read, period, no qualifiers.”
  9. Gagan (@afantasysky) recommends The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson. “I loved The Space Between Worlds for so many reasons but mainly for the fascinating take on parallel worlds, complex characters and amazing twists. It’s dark, layered and full of surprises.”
  10. Angie (@angiesreading) says: An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon takes the horrors and injustices of the antebellum South into space aboard the HSS Matilda. The mystery behind our protagonist, Aster, and her mother’s death, along with an incredible cast of characters made this one of my favorite reads of the year. 

And from me, I recommend The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers. This is one of my all-time favorite books — it manages to be a fun space voyage across the universe with buddies while also making you stop to think about the world around you. The rest of the Wayfarers series is just as good, and her standalone novella, To Be Taught, If Fortunate, is also outstanding.