Books that inspire some of the most creative bookstagrammers

Books that inspire some of the most creative bookstagrammers

I’d say that all bookstagrammers have to be creative — a lot of work goes into creating aesthetically pleasing pictures of books. But these influencers go above and beyond! From fashion to baking to drawing, they raise the bar for book reviews. We asked 26 bookstagrammers what book inspires them, and here’s what they said:

  1. Daci (@daciandthebooks) says: “The Book of Delights by Ross Gay is like if your smartest, wittiest friend—who also happened to be a poet—shared their gratitude journal with you. I read it on vacation and it helped me appreciate the mundane as much as (if not more than!) the remarkable.”
  2. Carmen (@tomesandtextiles) says: “A book that inspires me is We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Although this is technically an essay adapted from Chimamanda’s TED talk, I find myself regularly referencing the words within these pages as a way to reinforce my feelings about intersectional feminism and to motivate me to keep fighting against the patriarchy.”

  3. Lili (Utopia State of Mind) says: “I’ve been a fan of Mark Oshiro’s work since I read an early copy of Anger is a Gift and their recent release, Each of Us A Desert, is a transcendent book that emphasizes the importance of stories being told, our responsibility as a community to never forget, and the burden of carrying these weights alone. The stories that change us. Without which we become someone who doesn’t understand the weight of regret.”
  4. Holly (@bookcooklook) says: “I’ve read so many wonderful books during the pandemic that it’s hard to choose just one, so I’ll go with my most recent favorite, The Book of Longings by Sue Monk Kidd. I don’t typically “star rate” my books but if I did, this one would be five stars for sure. This magnificent novel is about a fictional character named Ana, who in this story is the wife of Jesus. It’s important to note that the book is not about Jesus per se, but rather about Ana herself, the women in her life, and her own strength, bravery and determination. It is very much a book about female empowerment, and while Ana likely never existed, the book is filled with historical details that add depth to the beautiful writing and captivating story.”
  5. Saida (@saidainabook) says:  “I am always inspired by so many books but the one I want to mention today is The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. For me, this book is a reminder that imagination and creativity know no limits. Full of magic and whimsy, The Night Circus breaks free of all sorts of boundaries and is endlessly inspiring.”
  6. Kate (@katesbookparade): says “Ever since I was very young, I’ve been inspired by The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles by Julie Andrews Edwards, a small but mighty story about finding the wonder that exists all around us. I used to be a children’s librarian, and children’s books always hit me in all the feels by reminding me of the richness of life’s possibilities!”
  7. Thom (@readbooks.servelooks) recommends: “Temporary by Hilary Leichter. Imagine a world where virtually anything can be a job. One day you’re cleaning the deck of a pirate ship and the next you’re an assassin’s assistant. In that same world, you might have 18 unnamed boyfriends that live in your apartment and bond while you’re gone. With Temporary, Leichter has written a novel that is absurd, hilarious, heartfelt, and memorable.”
  8. Mariah (@thekneadtoread) says: “I recommend Sabrina & Corina: Stories by Kali Fajardo-Anstine. Each short story, centered around Latina characters of indigenous descent, will hit you right en la corazón. Excellent content, powerful message, and magnificent writing so you can’t go wrong!”
  9. Melanie (@drawntobooks) says: “Although the subject matter might be a little dark to read amidst the pandemic, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road is a book that has always inspired me. His sharp yet poetic writing is nothing short of masterful. The father/son dynamic was explored so deeply and beautifully I will forever remember it’s characters and their journey.”
  10. Zoe (@zoecreatesthings) says: “A book that inspires me is Mira Jacob’s graphic memoir, Good Talk. Oscillating between hilarious and heart-rending, Mira Jacob’s storytelling is strikingly earnest and beautifully nuanced. I’d recommend it to anyone interested in creative mediums. (I’d also recommend it to anyone, period.)”
  11. Robbi (@book.to.bowl) says: “I really connected with the character of Thandie in What We Lose by Zinzi Clemmons, as she navigates early adulthood and works to define her identity as a black woman; the story is a truly intimate look into what it means to be a black woman who often doesn’t fit into certain stereotypes. Additionally, as someone who loves to cook and eat, I appreciated how certain memories in the book are connected to a particular dish or cooking experience.”
  12. Debora (@oh_apostrophe) says: “Little Women by Louisa May Alcott inspired me to be a reader, a writer, and an independent woman. The beauty and modernity of Little Women is that it gives girls the freedom to be whoever they want to be — dreamer or doer, poet or princess, homemaker or wave maker.”

  13. Mel (@acosyreader) says: “Any Ordinary Day: Blindsides, Resilience and What Happens After the Worst Day of Your Life by Leigh Sales is an eye-opening and compassionate book that has inspired me to view grief in a new light, and taught me so much about how we as humans cope with the challenges life throws at us. I read this book at a tough time, and it helped me see new ways of showing up for, and supporting, grieving friends and family. Full of compassion, empathy, good humour, and resilience – there’s something for everyone to be found in these pages.”
  14. Mel (@thebookfamilyrogerson) says: “Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane is a nonfiction book that explores human existence in the context of deep time. Wide-reaching and at times almost mythical in tone, the author’s subterranean adventures to locations including the Paris catacombs and Norwegian sea caves challenge and dizzy the reader. This haunting read inspired us to assess our place in the world and consider the legacy we’d like to pass onto future generations.”

  15. Maria (@mpjustreading) says: “The Body Papers by Grace Talusan inspires me to speak up about trauma and mental health issues. It’s a great reminder that cruelty or abuse should never be faced alone, especially since silence can never protect or heal anyone.”
  16. Em (@pagingserenity) says: “I recommend The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi! It’s a story full of magic and friendship. The worldbuilding and writing are so captivating. And the characters are diverse and so likeable they feel like your own friends by the end of the book.”
  17. Claire (@drawmeabookreview) says: “A book that has inspired me is The Right To Be Cold by Sheila Watt-Cloutier. Highlighting Indigenous voices and Canadian literature is important to me, and Sheila Watt-Cloutier is someone who has dedicated her life to fighting for and supporting her small Indigenous community in northern Quebec. I love that she’s done so many different things, from education worker to environmental activist, all to help those in her local community.”
  18. Monica (@oxfordjanebooks) says: “Things In Jars by Jess Kidd is a newer favorite of mine! It is marvelously executed: magical, so funny, turn-your-stomach gross, odd and psychologically astute. I was completely captivated. Jess Kidd describes 19th century London so that you want to lift your feet out of the muck and cover your face to avoid the stench. Definitely a story for those of us who love a smartly crafted mystery with brilliantly created characters.”
  19. Zaina (@writingquills) recommends: “Love From A to Z by S.K. Ali. This is an #ownvoices novel and a love story between two Muslim teens. As a Muslim myself, it warmed my heart to read a YA story with positive Muslim representation and that, along with the budding romance and beautiful imagery, made me feel a good deal of emotions. This book talks about Islamophobia, living with Multiple Sclerosis, cultural appropriation and so much more. Zayneb and Adam inspired me a lot. I adored Love From A to Z and would definitely recommend it!”
  20. Vivien (@steepedinwords) says: “I would love to recommend Circe by Madeline Miller. Circe is strong and does not let men or her life circumstances dictate the way she will live. She’s independent and strong willed who loves unconditionally and does everything in her power for her loved ones.”
  21. Amanda (@escape_in_a_book) recommends: “Autoboyography by Christina Lauren. This YA queer love story is a powerful ride. Coming of age, loving who you are, the toxicity prejudices…so much is unpacked during this fictional journey. Equally entertaining and important, a must read for everyone.”
  22. Katie (@baytownbookie) says: “My book recommendation is Beginner’s Pluck: Build Your Life of Purpose and Impact Now by Liz Forkin Bohannon. Liz debunks the myth that your passion and purpose are just floating out in the universe waiting to be discovered and encourages readers to cultivate their passions through pluck (spirited and determined courage.) It is packed full of charm, wit, humor, 90s references and practical ideas for building passion/purpose in your life.”
  23. Suruchi (@_ink_and_fables) says: “The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri inspires me because it teaches us how we should never ever let go of our roots. It’s a medium to reconnect with our family and no matter what, we are a product of our roots.”
  24. Britannia (@booklooksbyb) says: “One of my favorite recent inspiration books is The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton. This series is not only visually beautiful, fantastical & engaging but it is also very smart in how it challenges & reflects concepts of beauty & how we as a society see, value and treat people’s bodies (especially the bodies of women). As a makeup artist, a book lover and a woman of color, this story really resonated with me and I would highly recommend it!”

  25. Aleyxandra (@alyxandriaang) says: “My book recommendation is Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. This heartwarming, generational tale is a story that teaches you compassion, the struggles of immigrants and the importance of identity in an unknown world. This book inspires me every day to be humble and resilient.”
  26. Jennie (@jennieshaw) says: “The Library of the Unwritten by A.J. Hackwith made me want to rent a billboard that featured the cover and a speech bubble containing bold all caps that screamed READ THIS BOOK. Because holy smokes, it’s amazing!! I’d been in a reading slump when this book’s quirky adventure of Hell’s librarian reminded me why escapist novels are so important — they’re like red bull for imagination inspiration!”
  27. Meg (@bookswithmeg_) recommends: “Monday’s Not Coming by Tiffany D. Jackson. I loved this one because just as soon as you think what’s going on … it’s something completely different. The emotions that this book pulled from me was unexpected but made me love this book THAT much more!”

 

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